Iowa Democrats are poised to return to the U.S. House as the majority delegation in back-to-back elections for just the fourth time in the history of the Hawkeye State.

If reelected, the state’s Democratic U.S. Representatives (Bruce Braley from the 1st District, David Loebsack from the 2nd District, and Leonard Boswell from the 3rd District) will be in the majority for just the 11th time in 82 general elections since Iowa achieved statehood in 1846.

Democrats have only held a majority in the state delegation in back-to-back election years in three eras: 1847-1850 (before the founding of the Republican Party), 1932-1936 (after the stock market crash and the ensuing Great Depression), and 1974-1976 (after the Watergate fallout).

The only other years in which more Democrats than Republicans were elected to the U.S. House in Iowa are 1964 and 2006 (both years in which Democratic landslides occurred across the country).

History therefore tells us the fact that Iowa’s three Democrats will likely return as the majority delegation to the U.S. House in 2008 suggests another Democratic landslide nationwide is in the works this November.

Overall, 523 Republicans have been elected to the U.S. House in general and special elections, compared to just 115 Democrats, and 4 representing third parties. That represents an 81.5 percent to 17.9 percent historical advantage.